5 Reasons Why You Need This Eyeliner

Seeing a woman with running or smudged makeup is quite unsightly—unless they’re acting in a drama, in that case, a teary messy look is necessary. But for most of us ordinary people, a weather proof makeup is essential to keep us from wasting time doing touch-ups.

One very important part of our makeup is the eyeliner. After trying multiple waterproof products, I found out they eventually smudged anyway.  To cut to the chase, I tried this wonderful gel-type waterproof eyeliner that glides as smooth as silk. It’s from Tony Moly (a South Korean brand) and it’s called Perfect Eyes Gel Fit Waterproof Liner.

 

Here are the 5 reasons to love this liner!

Reason # 1: It’s GEL! I love this fact because it means it’s really easy to apply and it doesn’t hurt when you attempt to spread it across your eyelid like other pencils.

Reason # 2: Built-in tools! This eyeliner comes in a twist-type container and pencils of this type cannot be sharpened right? Well, this smart eyeliner comes with a sharpener too. It’s a cone-shaped plastic tool that will give you that defined eyeliner you want.

Plus it also has a sponge tip you can use—when the liner hasn’t dried yet—to create a sort of smoky look. I have to tell you this eyeliner dries rather fast so work as quick as you can if you want to smudge it.

Reason # 3: When dry, it doesn’t show a sign of scattering anywhere no matter how many times you blink per second. This is important especially for monolids whose eyelids typically swallow up eyeliners. I also tried rubbing it with my finger but nothing happened. This is also perfect for people living in tropical or humid areas where moisture frequently beats our make up.

Reason # 4: It’s available in more than 10 different shades to complement your skin and eye color.  You can get it from all shades of brown to black to even pink!

Reason # 5: It’s very affordable!

And there you have it! My five reasons why you have to have to this eyeliner. I have no regrets buying this product.

Feel free to leave your comments!

 

 

Eyelash Growth Products

dr lashWant longer lashes without the hassle of using mascara? If yes, then I’m sure you’ve thought of using latanoprost. If you’ll ask your dermatologist or cosmetic surgeon, they’ll tell you it’s a drug that was originally used to treat glaucoma by facilitating the outflow of fluid in the uveoscleral tract. It is actually a prostaglandin analog and is available in ophthalmic solutions. However, its side effect—eyelash growth—was discovered and since then it has become known as an ingredient for beautiful thick eyelashes!

Latanoprost has recently been discovered to stimulate eyelash growth and some sources say it can be a treatment for alopecia of the eyelashes. Another prostaglandin analog that is effective for eyelash growth is bimatoprost. The latter has greater or similar efficacy than latanoprost in lowering intraocular pressure and also works better for eyelash growth; the bad news is that hyperemia or reddening occurs more often with bimatoprost.

Eyelash growth enhancers not only lengthen lashes, they make them thicker as well. Additional rows of hair grow and the color becomes darker.  What once were vellus hairs now become terminal hairs. Vellus hair refers to the ones that are thin and barely noticeable; with prostaglandin analogs like latanoprost and bimatoprost, these become terminal, meaning, thicker and longer.

Mechanism

But exactly how do these phenyl-prostaglandin analogs work for your lashes? Answer: latanoprost stimulates resting hair (resting hair is in the phase called telogen) to re-enter the anagen or growth phase of hair. To give you a better understanding, there are actually 4 phases of hair growth; namely, anagen (3-6 years), catagen/transition phase (1-2 weeks), telogen (5-6 weeks) and return to anagen. Latanoprost works on the dermal papilla and boosts the return to anagen phase. Scientists have also observed that hair follicles become bigger and the growth phase is prolonged.

Side Effects

Now, does lash growers sound perfect for you? Well, everything is not peachy. Watch out for its side effects! If it accidentally comes in contact with your eyeballs, it may irritate and cause it to redden which medical professionals call conjunctival hyperemia. Your iris and nearby skin can get darker, too.

Tips

When buying random eyelash growers, always check the ingredients listed at the back and know the active ingredient. If it has latanoprost or bimatoprost—and almost all eyelash growers do–well, at least now you know what to watch out for. Apply eyelash growers carefully to your lashes close to the roots but avoid smudging it too much on your skin. Choose the non-irritating brands if you have sensitive skin; LiLash and Latisse are popular in the market today. However, if you think prostaglandin analogs are not for you, there’s Idol Lash and Etude House’s Dr. Lash Ampoule. These products have several plant extracts designed to make your lashes healthier, thicker and longer; although I’m not sure if they could give you dramatic results.

So the bottomline is, be careful and bat an eyelash before using cosmetic products. Choose wisely and think before buying :)

 

Cosmetic Collagen

You’ve seen collagen practically everywhere but what does it actually do for your skin? Does it really work or is it just another failed cosmetics concept? Several products work theoretically but do not deliver when it comes to actual human trials; this article will tell you if that is the case with collagen.

What is it? Collagen is a fibrous protein that plays a very important role in various structures of the human body. There are several types in the human body and they provide integrity to structures such as the skin, bone, tendon, cartilage, hair, placenta, etc.

What do you use it for? Collagen, as a food ingredient has a texturizing effect while as a cosmetic ingredient, it has a moisturizing effect on the skin. It is also known to make the skin firmer, treat aging signs such as wrinkles and skin sagging. Collagen is now seen in almost every cosmetics brand from America to Asia. It is available as an eye cream, night cream, serum, facial foam, mask, and filler.

collagen

How does it work? Native collagen, though present in several cosmetic products, is absorbed poorly by the skin. To be specific, it is absorbed by the epidermis but not by the dermis. Its function, therefore, is not dependent on its internalization; rather, it keeps the skin (stratum corneum) moisturized by attracting water towards it. According to a double-blind, random control trial, it also prevents wrinkles and boosts proliferation of fibroblasts.

Forms of collagen in cosmetic products? There are several forms of collagen used in cosmetics today. The more common ones are hydrolysate and gelatin. Hydrolyzed collagen is made from enzymatic hydrolysis of native collagen, followed by a warm water extraction which yields a more soluble form of collagen. Hydrolyzed collagen is also available in tablets, capsules, and even several foods like yogurts, dairy drink, soups, high protein bars and candies. There is much to think about regarding the effectiveness of oral collagen because what we eat is broken down in our stomach anyways. On the other hand, when collagen is irreversibly denatured, its strands separate into coils and this is what is referred to as gelatin. The role of gelatin in cosmetics is almost similar to hydrolyzed collagen—with its lowered molecular weight, it can be better absorbed by the skin and hair.

In East Asia, collagen is added to enhance cosmetic products; for example, Han Skin’s Snail facial foam (a Korean brand) which has snail mucin also contains collagen and elastin. However, it is better to use cream or serum form instead of facial washes or foams; that way the product will stay longer on your skin and allow absorption.

Collagen works wonders and its functions are not just limited to what I mentioned above. So be sure to try out collagen products for younger looking skin!

 

References:

Chinese Journal of Aesthetic Medicine, 2008

International Journal of Cosmetic Science, 2005

Wellness Foods Europe, November 2006

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